Winnie Truong is both a painter and a drawer, but it’s her drawings that have captured my eye. Much like Burns and Oppenheim’s recreations of Burns’ teenage portraits, Truong’s portraits capture that same uncomfortable, sick in the stomach, gut feeling. Using nothing more than pencil crayon on pencil and expressive linework Truong’s pieces are clever (in particular the teeth being used as decorative hair accessories in “Ornament and Correction”) and funny, they never sit quite well with the viewer. Faces where they shouldn’t be, an overabundance of hair, floating disembodied hair, and those teeth (!) all work in conjunction perfectly to make a point that art isn’t simply about being beauty, it’s also about the power of uncomfortability*, and sometimes it works best when it pulls you out of your comfort zone of heavily coded images of what safe and natural “beauty” is.

“Ornament and Correction” (2010).
Pencil crayon on paper.
48’x72.

“Lady Gymkata” (2009).
Pencil crayon on paper.
48″ x 72″.


“Leonine”, (2010).
Pencil crayon on paper.
48″ x 72″.

See more of Truong’s work here.

* I am making this word up.

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